Heat fractures Greenland's main glacier

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH, 2020.-

The melting of Greenland's glacial ice cap has led to an increase in ocean levels by 1.1 centimeters between 1992 and 2018

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A direct consequence of climate warming and higher temperatures in Greenland, a 113 km2 ice mass has just come off the largest glacial ice cap in the Arctic, 79 N, Danish scientists announced. "We observed an increase in speed (disintegration) in this remaining glacial ice cap, the largest," Jason Box, a professor of glaciology at the Geological Institute of Denmark and Greenland, GEUS, told the AFP. In satellite images released by the GEUS, it can be seen that vast ice surfaces were now separated from that gigantic glacial ice cap in the northeastern Arctic territory, which flows into the "Fjord 79" ("Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden"). The landslides of a glacier are normal, but not immense icy platforms of that size. Since 1999, the ice cap of glacier 79 N has lost 160 km2, a surface twice as large as Manhattan Island, the Institute stressed in a statement. The phenomenon has accelerated in the last two years. "If hot summers like those seen over the past two years increase, they will contribute to accelerating sea level rise globally," the researcher said. The melting of Greenland's glacial ice cap has led to an increase in ocean levels by 1.1 centimeters between 1992 and 2018, the authors of a study that appeared last December in the journal Nature calculated. According to a recent study by the University of Lincoln (United Kingdom), the decline in frozen areas in Greenland will contribute a 10 to 12 cm rise in sea level by 2100.

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